Because of the “waves” made by posting our policy, we wanted to follow up with experts who specialize in the science of disease transmission to make sure our plan was as helpful and appropriate as possible.

Earlier this week we posted our policy in the event of a measles outbreak in close proximity to Madison.

Since then there has been quite a bit of discussion on our Facebook page.

We have also received several media inquiries and inquiries from other organizations wondering about sharing our policy with their clients.

Our policy was based on a commonsense (to us) approach to preventing disease transmission based on the best information we had access to.

Because of the “waves” made by posting our policy, we wanted to follow up with experts who specialize in the science of disease transmission to make sure our plan was as helpful and appropriate as possible. 

Special thanks to Dr. Ildi Martonffy (UW Family Medicine) for forwarding our policy to her colleague, Jonathan Temte, MD, MS, PhD.  Dr. Temte has a background in epidemiology and is the Chair of the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. 

Dr. Temte graciously gave us permission to share his thoughts on our policy and some relevant information about the disease:  “Measles is the most contagious infectious disease.  Infants, prior to vaccination are all susceptible.  The likelihood of transmission to a susceptible individual, should there be an active case, is about 90% within a closed shared airspace, such as a store or classroom.  Individuals are contagious before the onset of rash. Infants have a relatively high right of adverse outcomes, such as measles pneumonia; more than 30% require hospitalization.  This is also true for susceptible pregnant women.”

In regards to our policy, Dr. Temte said, “I think your approach is very reasonable given the numbers of unvaccinated individuals in the Madison community and providing the best care to your clients.  Also keep in mind that about 1/30 people in the general public is immunocompromised (HIV, cancer chemotherapy, transplant recipient) and these casual and anonymous contacts are also at high risk.”

We are very grateful for his feedback.

Furthermore we want to thank all the people who have been communicating respectfully on our Facebook page.  Vaccination is a subject that creates a high level of emotion.  Happy Bambino has always advocated for informed decision-making in healthcare decisions.  We believe that conversations about healthcare issues are important in facilitating informed decision-making.  Hateful language is harmful because it can result in closed minds and hearts and lead to defensiveness and entrenched attitudes/beliefs.  Respectful communication is paramount to facilitating thoughtful and productive conversations.

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